Want to get involved? Below are a few easy ways to do so…

  • Join the Cheer-Up Hut Club and follow the eight week self-paced program aimed at assisting you to more easily reseach, write and enhance your Anzac story.
  • Visit a Cheer-Up Hut and record your Anzac story in the recording booths available on site.
  • Attending a digital storytelling workshop providing you with tips and pointers for getting the best results.
  • Photograph memorabilia and scan precious documents and photos inside the Cheer-Up Hut.  You can then use these to enhance your Anzac story for entry into our short film competition. Find out about this here:  Anzac Centenary Short Film Competition.
  • Talk to ex-service men and women in your family and community, and see if they are willing to share their story with you.
  • We can also match-make you to a Veteran or War Widow who have let us know they would like to tell their story but need support to achieve this.
  • Research family members who served during the First World War with the help of the Australian War Memorial’s collections and online resources and the RSL Virtual War Memorial
  • Visit the RSLs Virtual War Memorial website and identify a relative ex-service man and woman about whom you can then add more information.
  • Attend an Anzac Day Dawn Service in your local community.  Details of all South Australian Anzac Day Dawn Services can be found on the RSL SA website.
  • Search for a name on the Roll of Honour at the Australian War Memorial.
  • Enter the annual Premier’s Anzac Spirit School Prize
  • Apply for an Anzac Centenary Commemorative Grant
  • Enter an Anzac Centenary competition.
  • Become an Anzac Centenary SA social media champion.
  • Locate and visit your local war memorial, photograph it and upload your picture onto an Anzac Centenary SA social media site with a short reflection on what the war memorial means to you.
  • Identify a plaque or honour roll at a South Australian businesses, photograph it and write a few hundred words about its history and significance and we’ll share it for you.
  • Refer to the Anzac Centenary Style Guide – Centenary Edition for a host of up to date information about Australia’s Anzac Day traditions and protocols.
  • Register your organisation’s community event, initiative or activity on our Community Calendar of Events.
  • Teachers can share their curriculum units on Australian wartime and peacekeeping history through the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Curriculum Sharing Project.
  • Browse the Mapping our Anzacs tool at the National Archives of Australia. You’ll find 375,971 records of service in the Australian Army during the First World War listed according to the person’s place of birth or enlistment.